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Accounts Receivable vs. Accounts Payable – What's the Difference?

Up-to-date financial information is important for any business seeking outside investment. Accounts payable and receivable are essential accounts that show how much money flows in and out of...
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Top 5 Types of Accounts Receivable Jobs & Career Choices

There are many accounts receivable jobs out there, and each one has its own set of responsibilities and tasks. Depending on the company's needs and the experience of the individual, different account receivable jobs may exist. 

This article has compiled the Top 5 jobs in the Accounts Receivable management and their typical job responsibilities.

 

1 - Accounts Receivable Clerks - Who are Accounts Receivable Clerks, and what are their job responsibilities?

An Accounts Receivable Clerk is responsible for the timely collection of payments from customers. They are also responsible for ensuring that all invoices are paid on time and that all debts are collected. Often, an Accounts Receivable Clerk will work with other departments within a company to ensure that all debts are collected. 

In addition, they may be responsible for creating and sending out invoices, tracking customer payments, and more. The Salary for this position depends on experience but is typically around $30,000-$40,000 per year. An Accounts Receivable Clerk must complete a variety of tasks to ensure that the company receives accurate debt payments.

They may be responsible for:

  • Accounts Receivable Clerks are often required to have strong written and verbal communication skills.
  • They must work well with others, and they often have to manage time efficiently. 
  • Accounts Receivable Clerks are also required to have excellent organizational skills, as they need to keep track of their company's finances.

Accounts Receivable Clerks receive training on how to track the company's invoices, and they need to be able to work well in a team environment. 

Advancement in this position is usually based on employee performance and the company's growth rate. For example, accounts Receivable Clerks often start as a clerk, work their way up to become an assistant, and then move into management positions.

 

2 - Accounts Receivable Manager - Who is an Accounts Receivable Manager, and what are their Job Responsibilities?

An Accounts Receivable Manager is responsible for maintaining accurate and up-to-date records of all payments made to their company's customers and collecting payments that are due. They also ensure that invoices are processed promptly and that payments are made to suppliers on time. 

In addition, an Accounts Receivable Manager may be responsible for creating or managing customer profiles, conducting market research, and developing financial forecasts. The type of companies that use an Accounts Receivable Manager may include:

  • Manufacturing companies sell products to wholesalers and retailers, including food, clothing, and electronics firms.
  • Service companies provide services to other companies, such as cleaning or setting up events. 

Accounts Receivable Managers are also responsible for working with and managing the cash flow of their business. They may be responsible for reconciling accounts, forecasting future receivables, handling outstanding invoices, and ensuring that all the necessary information is in place to meet credit requirements. 

Accounts Receivable Managers are sometimes called Payables/Receivables Managers. Accounts Receivable Managers are also responsible for the overall financial health of their business. They are charged with making sure that they have all the necessary financial information needed to meet the business requirements.

The Average Salary for an Accounts Receivable Manager is $65,000; however, this number can vary greatly depending on the size of the company and the location of the job.

3 - Accounts Receivable Processor - Who is an Accounts Receivable Processor, and what are their Job Responsibilities?

Accounts receivable processors work for a small number of companies that do business with businesses and individuals. Some of them work in offices, while others work from home. They may also be called accountants or bookkeepers. In the United States, accounts receivable processors typically work for small businesses that are unincorporated and operate under their names. 

They also work for non-profit organizations, educational institutions, and governments. In the United Kingdom, accountants and bookkeepers are sometimes called "receivable processors," but this is a misnomer because they do not process any receivables. Instead, they prepare the accounts of small businesses that provide services to larger businesses.

An accounts receivable processor is an important part of any company. They are responsible for handling the money that comes in from customers. Their Salary can vary depending on their experience, but it is typically a good-paying job, and they get paid $35,000+ a year.

 

4 - Accounts Receivable Specialist - Who is an Accounts Receivable Specialist, and what are their Job Responsibilities?

An Accounts Receivable Specialist is a professional who helps manage the accounting and collection of money owed to a business. They work with customers to collect payments, track payments, and ensure that bills are paid on time. 

The Specialist also reviews invoices to ensure accuracy and completeness before they are sent out to customers. They may also be responsible for creating budgets and tracking progress against those budgets. 

Accounts Receivable Specialists typically report to an Accounts Manager, who is usually in charge of a department or division. Therefore, the Specialist needs to work closely with their manager and follow all policies and procedures.

The Average Salary of an accounts receivable specialist is around $40,000 per year. However, this Salary can vary depending on the experience of the Specialist, the location of the job, and the size of the company. 

Accounts receivable specialists are responsible for maintaining and organizing a company's accounts receivable records. They also work with customers to ensure that payments are received on time.

 

5 - Accounts Receivable Supervisor - Who is an Accounts Receivable Specialist, and what are their Job Responsibilities?

An Accounts Receivable Supervisor is responsible for ensuring that all invoices are paid on time and that the company's accounts receivable are in good standing. This position typically requires experience in accounting and knowledge of invoice processing procedures. 

An Accounts Receivable Supervisor usually oversees a team of employees who process invoices. This position typically requires experience in accounting and knowledge of invoice processing procedures. 

An Accounts Receivable Supervisor ensures that all invoices are paid on time. This includes working with customers and vendors to ensure that payments are made and reconciling discrepancies. The Accounts Receivable Supervisor must also monitor aging reports to identify past due accounts.

A typical accounts receivable supervisor's salary ranges from $40,000 to $60,000 per year. 

In conclusion, there are many different jobs in the accounts receivable field. No matter your experience or education level, there is an opportunity for you in this exciting and growing industry. If you are interested in pursuing a career in accounts receivable, be sure to do your research and find the right job for you.

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